Jedidiah Dore in Hang Together: collaborative work + process at Pratt Institute Library

I have always loved art and I believe that my soul is the soul of an artist. However, the cold truth is that other than making the odd geometric shape or stick figure doodle, or maybe finger-painting, I am no artist… So, I count myself as very lucky when I am able view great pieces of art and most fortunate when I am able to actually meet and talk to the actual artist.

Jedidiah Dore, super-powered illustrator of the award winning art studio Ink & Sword is one of the artists I had the great fortune of meeting last year when I attended the NASASocial celebrating the the 50th Anniversary of the Deep Space Network and from February 2nd – March 30th, a collection of his workings will be on display as a part of the Hang Together – collaborative work + progress exhibit at the Pratt Institute Library, 200 Willoughby Ave. Brooklyn, NY.

One look at the pic above of his recent drawing of the Pratt Library should convince you to check this exhibit out if you are in the area.

See more about the amazing Ink & Sword Art Studio here!

Art Basel Miami Beach 2014 Wrap Up

Art Basel Miami Beach 2014 has wrapped up another successful edition. As their latest press release states:

Art Basel’s 13th edition in Miami Beach closed today, Sunday, December 7, 2014,
amidst strong praise from gallerists, private collectors, museum groups and the
media. Highlights of the show included the introduction of the new Survey sector,
which brought 13 art-historical projects to the fair, including many rare works
never before exhibited in an art fair context; and Art Basel’s staging with Performa
of Ryan McNamara’s ‘MEƎM 4 Miami: A Story Ballet About the Internet’ at the Miami
Grand Theater. Solid sales were reported across all levels of the market and
throughout the run of the show. Featuring 267 leading international galleries from
31 countries, the show – whose Lead Partner is UBS – attracted an attendance of
73,000 over five days. Attendees included representatives of over 160 museum and
institution groups from across the world – and a surging number of new private
collectors from the Americas, Europe and Asia.

Miami Beach’s leading museums and private collections also timed their strongest
shows of the year to coincide with Art Basel in Miami Beach. The Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO) presented ‘Impulse, Reason, Sense, Conflict/Abstract Art in the Ella Fontanals-Cisernos Collection’ while the de la Cruz Collection Contemporary Art Space showed ‘Beneath The Surface’. It was a year of anniversaries as The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse marked its 15th anniversary, and the The Rubell Family Collection presenting ’50 Years of Marriage’, celebrating Mera and Don Rubell’s half a century of marriage and collecting.

Design Miami, the leading global forum for collectible design, also celebrated its 10th anniversary and also presented their inaugural Design Visionary/ Award to Peter Marino. See more posts about Design Miami here.

The Pérez Art Museum Miami presented Mario Garcia Torres, Beatriz Milhazes and
Geoffrey Farmer. The Norton Museum of Art presented ‘RAW: Klara Kristalova’, while the Bass Museum of Art showed ‘One Way: Peter Marino’. The NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale showed ‘Café Dolly: Picabia, Schnabel, Willumsen’.

Also, Art Basel and BMW announced a new partnership supporting emerging artists. Starting in 2015, the BMW Art Journey will enable emerging artists to go on a journey of creative discovery to a destination of their choice. Functioning
as a mobile studio, the BMW Art Journey is open to artists from Positions and
Discoveries, Art Basel’s sectors for emerging artists in Miami Beach and Hong Kong. For more information, please visit http://bmw-art-journey.com.

 

Khan Academy x Tate Britain

A most fabulous partnership with Tate Britain and the Khan Academy has resulted in being able to “walk through” 500 years of British art with the Tate’s curators.

Check out the video below and I think you will agree that this is so cool!!!


 Director's Highlights: Penelope Curtis: Join Director Penelope Curtis as she shares highlights from Tate Britain's displays and considers how new visual dialogues emerge by juxtaposing different styles, mediums, and voices.
Learn more about the artists featured in this video:
  James Havard Thomas, Lycidas, 1902-8
  Gwen John, Nude Girl, 1909-10
  Eric Gill, Ecstasy, 1910-11
  Mona Hatoum, Performance Still, 1985 (printed 1995)
  Sonia Boyce, MIssionary Position II, 1985
  Richard Hamilton, The Citizen, 1981-3

Gordon Parks Exhibition at the High Museum of Art

Gordon Parks: Segregation Story (Nov 15 – Jun 7) opened this past Saturday at the High Museum of Art and it a stunning look at reality of life under segregation.

As the press release states:

The images provide a unique perspective on one of America’s most controversial periods. Rather than capturing momentous scenes of the struggle for civil rights, Parks portrayed a family going about daily life in unjust circumstances. Parks believed empathy to be vital to the undoing of racial prejudice. His corresponding approach to the Life project eschewed the journalistic norms of the day and represented an important chapter in Parks’ career-long endeavor to use the camera as his “weapon of choice” for social change. “The Restraints: Open and Hidden” gave Parks his first national platform to challenge segregation. The images he created offered a deeper look at life in the Jim Crow South, transcending stereotypes to reveal a common humanity.

Gordon Parks was a trailblazing artist and filmmaker. Parks was initially drawn to photography as a young man after seeing images of migrant workers published in a magazine, which made him realize photography’s potential to alter perspective. By 1944, Parks was the only black photographer working for Vogue, and he joined Life magazine in 1948 as the first African-American staff photographer. He would later go on to  co-founded Essence magazine and served as the editorial director for the first three years of its publication. Parks later became Hollywood’s first major black director when he released the film adaptation of his autobiographical novel “The Learning Tree,” for which he also composed the musical score, however he is better known as the director of the 1971 hit movie “Shaft.” Parks received the National Medal of Arts in 1988 and received more than 50 honorary doctorates over the course of his career. He died in 2006

A must-see exhibition!

Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Department Store, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.
Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Department Store, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.

 

Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Outside Looking In, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.
Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Outside Looking In, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.

 

Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Ondria Tanner and Her Grandmother Window-Shopping, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.
Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Ondria Tanner and Her Grandmother Window-Shopping, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.

 

Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Airline Terminal, Atlanta, Georgia, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.
Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Airline Terminal, Atlanta, Georgia, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.

 

Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Mr. and Mrs. Albert Thornton, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.
Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006), Mr. and Mrs. Albert Thornton, Mobile, Alabama, 1956, courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PBS Video: Kehinde Wiley – An Economy of Grace


PBS Video: Kehinde Wiley – An Economy of Grace

A compelling look at one of the most intriguing, innovative and intellectual artists of the 21st century.

You can sit and look at a Kehinde Wiley portrait for hours and still not discover all the intricate layers.

Kehinde Wiley is taking portraiture to the next, next, next level !